8 comments:

Stephen said...

That's fantastic work Gearoid. You've been busy. :)

Pat said...

Really good work Gearoid; is the framed portrait on the floor your work too?

Gearoid said...

Thanks, guys! The picture on the floor was an experiment using a passport-size photo, enlarging it to the nth degree on a photo-copier - thus separating out all the pixels. I then selected what I thought were the most significant features and covered the area in black indian indian ink. I suspect the iconic Che Guevara poster might have been created using a similar technique. Sorry I haven't been meeting the group for some time due to circumstances, but I follow your offerings on the blog with great interest. Ciao!

Tracy O'Brien said...

oh Cool!! I had spotted that in the background too and thought it was really striking, what a brilliant technique. Must try!!

Not to worry Gearoid, so long as you know you are welcome to come along whenever you like!

Veronika Samlova said...

Great stuff, Gearoid. Keep up the good work. Very nice.

Stephen said...

Jim Fitzpatrick (deadly celtic artist :) ) created the Che image from a photograph by Alberto Korda.

"To create the image Fitzpatrick made a paper negative on a piece of equipment called a grant. They were then printed in one color black and one color red, and he handpainted the star in yellow. Fitzpatrick "wanted the image to breed like rabbits" and hand printed thousands of images to give away to anyone for free in London, in addition to getting friends to pass them out while encouraging others to make their own versions. He printed about a hundred copies at a time to fulfill the demand of political groups in Ireland, France, and Holland who began requesting the image. A batch was also sent to Spain, where they were seized by Franco's police."

Gearoid said...

Thanks for that info, Stephen. The poster certainly caught the popular imagination big-time. I know Jim Fitzpatrick did a lot of celtic mythical stuff, very intricate and very colourful and the Che Guevara thing would not be typical I expect. I hope he had the sense to copyright it!

Stephen said...

Quite the opposite. He had the sense not to copyright the early versions :) He wanted it to proliferate as he was more interested in the work than the profit. Later on he did copyright the main image and signed that over to a children's hospital in Cuba. The original artwork he gave to Che's widow.

Jim's celtic work is fantastic. The stuff he did for Celtworld in Tramore was amazing.